Winterlude Eco Dye Prints on Silk

To continue the previous dye report:

My “Winterlude” project combines dyeing with printing so as to extract plant pigments by immersing tied or clamped bundles/stacks of leaves with papers (cotton/cellulose fibres) and leaves with textiles (silk/protein fibres) in simmering/180 degree plant dyes.

Two summers ago, when I first began using natural dyes to print textiles and paper, I experimented with Purple Cabbage. See this image of silk crepe de chine below: No colour change, still lovely mottled blues. I had several pieces in my stash. What if I overdyed some with my winter leaves in a walnut dye bath? I love blues and browns and yellows together!

So to start with, I bundled the previously eco printed/dyed silk with the winter leaves over bamboo skewers so that I could snap them and bend them to fit the crockpot. I tied the bundle tightly with waxed linen thread, entered it into the dye pot and processed at a gentle 180 degrees for about an hour. I wanted the linen thread to make a lot of delicate lines of resist prints. You can tie linen thread really tight, too. (I got my linen thread at a leather work supply store. It is not easy to find and not cheap, either)

Here we are after the procesing and after the thread has been removed (I unbundled right away. No patience.) The thin, light lines on the bundle are the lines of resist prints. Of course, the waxed linen thread was dyed at the same time, its wax all melted off in the dye bath. The bendy bundle came about as a result of bending the bamboo skewers, as noted.

L
Now the reveal: The blues come from two sources: first, the acer palmatum prints:

Some blue patches, as in this detail below, are from the Purple Cabbage print that survived the walnut dye bath; the resist lines, now characteristic of this printing method, show beautiful marks from the walnut dye and linen thread:

Other views:

Resist lines: I LOVE the white tracery effect. This passage looks like something hand drawn, such a great contrast to the more diffuse prints and the colours.

Printed silk in front, printed linen at rhe back (more next post on linen) – the effects of the blue in the silk make a grey blue background on the silk, while the white linen, undyed previously, retains the lighter background colour. Both are lovely.

Walnut on Purple Cabbage blue mottles on silk, contrasted against the same leaf pigments on linen.

Below:

Part of the Winterlude collection, printed with winter leaves processed in dye baths.

Left to right:

1. Paper in coreopsis-tagetes 2. Linen in coreopsis-tagetes 3. Paper in coreopsis-tagetes 4. Linen in coeropsis- tagetes 5. Silk in walnut 6. Linen in coreopsis- tagetes 7. Paper in walnut

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

More next time – on vintage linen.

 

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About wendyfe

I am a fibre artist working in mixed media textiles with a focus on vintage cloth reworked with stitching, natural dyeing, eco printing and rust printing . My work can be seen at www.wendyfeldberg.ca.
This entry was posted in Art Cloth, dye plants, Eco Prints and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Winterlude Eco Dye Prints on Silk

  1. Celia Wilson says:

    Beautiful results, Wendy!

    • wendyfe says:

      Thanks , Celia!
      Your experiments, too, are sharing the wealth! Have you combined eco prints with earth prints? You could come up with a snazzy name for that combo. Printing with earth pigments has to be the oldest form of printing in the world – totally “eco” in approach, too, “eco” being a term that tells about the intention of the artist towards the use of their materials. Karen Diadick Casselman first used it in her term “eco dye”. India Flint, Karen’s student, had similar concerns re environment and so came up with “eco print” A rose by any other name, we love that work!

      Wendy

  2. randi says:

    stunning! I love the effects of overdyeing on the silk. thanks for sharing your process,I learn so much from you. love your titles too, forest floor, winterlude–beautiful descriptions or your lovely bodies of work

    • wendyfe says:

      Thanks, Randi. I have to say I have learned so much from others myself! Books,blogs, articles have been my reliable sources since I do not know personally anyn dyers who do this kind of printing, and have only recently met a few local dyers. But your own experiments under local conditions are the best teacher of all. I so much appreciate that others share so generously. I would have little to offer on this blog without that backup! My next big learning step will be in teaching- nothing pushes you to learm more than a class asking a bunch of questions you cannot fully answer!

      Wendy

  3. llewena says:

    really enjoyed the look love the tracery lines made by threads tyed

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