More walnuts



Last time I reported on making walnut colour extract on its way to becoming ink. The walnuts have been fermenting since late summer 2015. They started out in big jars (128 fl oz), a couple of dozen green-hulled walnuts in each jar with water to cover, left to solar-soak outside until frost, then transported inside to dark studio cupboards.

Most recipes I have looked at suggest removing the green hull and using that part. I thought that maybe some extra tannins might enter the dye if I left the nutmeats inside their shells and cooked them along with the green bits. After cooking ( and before being donated to the critters outside) I find they  look a quite lovely deep brown:

 

Walnut does quite well as a dye without cooking. I found it enough to simply soak a discoloured vintage white wool coat in a bucket of fermenting walnuts. After a couple of weeks soaking and a rinse in plain water, this was the colour:

You can see that different shades of white wool had been used to crochet this thrift-shop find. I could also have soaked the coat a second and third time for deeper shades. Wool dyes beautifully in walnut- here are some more examples from a few pre-ink years ago:

Eco printed wool pre-felt, native plants.

Lambs-wool cardy dyed with walnuts, iron nails and eucalyptus (I  forget which kind)

Little strips of blanket trimmings bundled with various eucalyptus and immersed in a walnut dye bath – also from past dye pots.

Linen and cotton dye well also, as does paper. Here are some samples of eco dye prints made in October 2013 while Shlomo and I were in residence at Arte Studio Ginestrelle near Assisi in Umbria. The walnut there ( photo below) is the Juglans regia – ours in Ottawa is Juglans nigra.

Notice the distinct pinky lavender colour that comes out with the yellow pigment in the eco print.

 

The photo above shows one of my Artist Books with linen covers eco dyed in walnut; the pages are about other  plants of the Subasio Regional Park where the art residence was located. The title of the little book is “Pianticelli del Subasio”.

And now here is a little surprise – walnuts combined with wild grapes to make a colour extract. I found a reference to this combination in a book about First Nations quill dyeing traditions. The recommendation was to combine walnuts with ” a lot of wild grape” and cook that until the liquid went black. I stopped the cooking way before the liquid turned black and got this grey-blue-greenish colour you see on tag of the left hand bottle of ink. ( More on grapes next time) 

And to finish in a sweet walnut note from the kitchen: here is what we had for breakfast one day at the art residence: walnut-parmesan scones ( I do not have the recipe so must go back there and pick it up…)

Until next time.

Welcome to new readers and thank you to those who have been following along this inky passage this fall. I do have lots of ink-fixings in my stash yet to be explored so we are not done yet.

Happy Chanuka for tomorrow, too!

This year, I made some chanakiot for the grandkids  – The candle ” flames” are cut-outs with velcro attached so the kids can “light” their candles each night ( and open a little loot bag, too! )

Even if we do not celebrate Chanuka, we  can still be the light!

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!

Yes, dear Readers, I am still blogging, despite the long hiatus in posts. Welcome to all who have subscribed in the last year and to readers who just pop by for a look now and then. Thank you for your comments and your encouragement to keep on making art! I have much to be grateful for this year despite the obstacles. Today I want to tell you about that.

But not too much text from me just now – let us begin with a picture! Ottawa was hit by some destructive weather two weeks ago; my area was fortunate in that we only lost power for a few days. Others lost their homes. Miraculously, only a few  people were injured, thank God not more; alas,  one poor sheep died, along with a chicken. Many trees were uprooted, though.

Here is what it looked like in my living room a few hours after the power went out:

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The skinny candles are burning on candlesticks made by Shlomo. Thank you, Shlomo!  Thanks to a charged-up iPad, I was able to read my iBooks until a kind neighbour-friend juiced it up again next day in a part of town unaffected by the power outage. TG! This fine neighbour has a gas stove that remained operational and allowed her to bring me coffee in the morning. A place must surely now be reserved in Heaven for her.

2018 has been a slow year for my art owing to injury to my art arm, the right. But it has come around finally, thanks to physio and cortisone shots…I am trying to get back in the studio more. Yet more to be grateful for.

On the Family Front: a wonderful suprise. My son and his Beloved of 12 years decided to get married officially. Attended by our families (including their own two kids), we had a wedding!

I love the photo of the ladies with The Bride in their beautiful wedding clothes and delighted smiles. My Hannah and Sarah are R and L of the bride. And check out 2 year old Ezra with his little cousin negotiating the consumption of his chips…you would think he was proposing…but my fave is the one with the little cousins and the Bride and Groom making silly faces. O, it was a happy day!

I made small artworks for the table: little paste-painted place cards in the form of a single-signature book, pamphlet sewn, for each guest; the  cards were housed  in keepsake slipcases covered in eco dyed silk printed with iris blooms ( a stash treasure). Guests were invited to write their good wishes and of course, the kids got to draw and colour.

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On the art show side of things: I am delighted to have some of my FRESCO wall art pieces on show at the new Ottawa Art Gallery- a fabulous new City of Ottawa venue for local and other artists. FRESCO is a series of eco dyed works ( indigo and rust) invoking the experience of finding beauty in decay and decomposition. Here is an example of a collection of smaller works in the series:

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Now a few pics of the garden, my refuge as well as my source of plants for pigments: it is fall now and time to collect and freeze the dye plants.

My fall dye work is starting: it is black walnut time! This year, I plan to make ink again ( in the past, I have made ink from blue iris, walnut and coreopsis) but will try some new plants. Meanwhile:

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Four cups of water, cooked in the slow cooker on low overnight. Cooks down to one cup, which will be strained in cheesecloth then cooked down some more. Then add a wee spoon of gum arabic – et voila, ink! Or let the the strained and cooked-down dye evaporate, then store the powder. The squirrels and I thank the Creator for the bounty of walnuts!

Finally for this LONG post, I leave you with some of the books  have been reading this year – all at once, of  course. They lie all over the house at the ready ( note the visual pun…)

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And a selfie – I have let my hair go as nature would have it ( much cheaper and less annoying than visiting the hairdresser)

Happy Thanksgiving to all and thank you for following. Next time, maybe I will have remembered better how to navigate the wordpress editor!

I have an renewal of my blog and website happening on the back burner so hope that will be done in the next few months – and at the same time, I am destashing My Stuff- and the studio Sacred Stash is not exempt this time around. Will report on how  the Stash can fuel creativity.

Meantime I have found excellent info and so far respectful sharing on a FB page Printing With Botanicals ( I think that is the title of the group). They are up on the latest Tricks and Tips for eco prints- check them out!

Blessings on your work and play, dear Readers. Click on the pics to see close-ups

Wendy

D8B908E9-D773-40BC-A830-9EE3D58971C2The fall garden 

 

 

 

 

Eco dyeing with edible plants: Purple Amaranth

Purple amaranth is an ornamental edible that can dye textiles too.

It self seeds profligately so I have planted it only once, about ten years ago. It gives a great shot of dark burgundy among all the greens and blues and yellows.

The dye bath coloured the textiles shades of  pink, mauve and light purple on (mordanted) linen and silk. It even covered yellow coreopsis and sumac yellow-green dye on linen.

As usual, I bundled the plant material onto a pre-eco-dyed textile and steamed it for an hour to get the colours and the prints. The amaranth simply gave up colour; it did not transfer a leaf shape.

Furthermore, the purple dye was fugitive in heat: at the start of the dye bath, the liquid was magenta; after an hour’s simmering (200 degrees) it turned reddish-orange  and the textile became golden yellow not pink!

Vintage linen refectory cloth, pre- eco-dyed several times, below:  before the amaranth, coreopsis, to give yellow:

 

 

Over-dyeing eco bundles : Tagetes and Purple Sandcherry

I have been dyeing the same eco-bundled textile several times to obtain layered plant prints.

For the first print layer, after steaming for an hour , oyster coloured silk noil bundled with purple sandcherry  leaves gave greens and blues with alum mordant:

A second bundling/steaming with tagetes (marigolds) and a third bundling/steaming with another layer of purple sandcherry leaves modified  the oyster-beige silk to yellowish-green, added several shades of orange, peach and rust from the marigold petals; plus layers of blue, green, blue-green and patches of purple from the sandcherry.

 

Natural Dyeing and Six Eco Printed Textiles

 

My natural dyeing experiments this month are about making ecobundles. The bundled plant material prints coloured marks on contact with the fabric but does not deliver an overall colour. I see how one plant (for example, the purple sandcherry/ Prunus cistena) delivers its colour and form onto different fabrics, pre-dyed or not,  and treated with tannin and alum as mordants and modifiers like iron, ammonia, baking soda, washing soda or copper to shift colours.

I am using a small number of plants available now in my garden and working with them in a rather restricted fashion in various combinations to see how much variety I can obtain. All the eco textiles shown were bundled and steamed for one hour. In some cases the dye from one bundle attached itself to another; for example, the threadleaf coreopsis dye leaked onto the purple sandcherry bundle and gave a lovely orange patch- a perfect colour complement to the blues in that bundle.

For more images of dye plants, see my Dye Plant page.

Eco textile 1

Below are purple sandcherry prints on Habtai silk, pre- dyed yellow in apple bark. A deeper yellow colour developed after ammonia was added to an already-yellow apple bark dye bath. The purple sandcherry leaves (plus twigs and stalks) gave a range of purple-blues and tad of green here and there:

This dyed textile is a fragment of vintage silk and comes from the lining of a vintage kimono. I have left some of the silk thread from the hand stitching in place. Woven motifs in the silks in Japanese kimonos were often hand painted.

Eco textile 2

Purple sandcherry leaves on beige silk noil: here the prints show up in darker blues and greens with streaks of yellow.

Detail of the eco print with purple sandcherry leaves

…see those orange splotches leaked from the  coreopsis  bundle!

Eco textile 3

The vivid orange is from Coreopsis verticillata, threadleaf coreopsis. A white silk fragment (mordanted in alum only,  pre-scoured with soda ash)  printed in  spectacular rust-oranges- and reached over to colour the sandcherry eco bundle, too.

Eco textile 4

Purple sandcherry leaf looks quite blue on white habotai silk, and a tad of anthemis tinctoria to make yellow here and there.

Eco textile 5

Silk noil, rust printed and flour-paste resist printed (with purple acrylic paint to give a crackle effect); then eco bundled with coral-pink geranium flowers(pelargonium house plant!) and rose-leaves; mordanted with alum; pre-scoured with soda ash (washing soda). The geranium flowers printed a deep purple blue grey; the rose leaves, kkaki.

Eco textile 6

This eco printed textile is a vintage linen kitchen-refectory cloth from a local monastery. It is darned in white thread and embroidered in one corner with motif in red cross stitch, an inventory control mark. Many of these utilitarian linens were handwoven by the nuns  in other parts of the world and distributed to monasteries in their network. Even a humble dishtowel was treated with great care.

I have printed this linen with rose leaves as a connection to the history of prayer often said with rosaries by the nuns in the monastery.

Eco Textiles and Natural Dyeing

June 16, 2011

This year my garden is supplying dye plants.  “Experiment” is the word! The June garden brings lush greenery and many kinds of blooms that can be used as plant material for natural dyeing.  Both whole plants and plant parts can be used to colour cloth and natural fibres and as mordants. With the help of several books about natural dyeing (see my References page) I am learning how to print and colour textiles with natural dyes. After dyeing and printing with plants, I plan to develop the art textile further with stitch and applique.

My aim for this part of the summer is to colour vintage linens and silk with dyes obtained only from plants in my garden and whatever I can find in the fields and hedgerows around here.  (I may cheat a bit and buy the odd dried dyestuff like cochineal or osage orange, IOW, dyestuffs I cannot make myself.)

Mordants

For my first attempts, I mordanted all the textiles by soaking them in an alum solution overnight before dyeing them. I also soaked some of them in tannic acid after a first overnight soak in  alum. The tannic acid was obtained by simmering sumac leaves for an hour.  Some of the textiles were mordanted in three stages: with alum, tannic acid, then alum again by soaking the textiles for at least two hours each time in each mordant (but mostly overnight).

The textiles were then simmered for an hour in the mordant,  then rinsed;   finally, immersed wet in a dye bath and simmered for an hour; then rinsed again, dried in the shade and ironed.

Dye Baths

I prepared the dye baths by cooking up at a simmer about one pound of plant material to one pound of dry textile (I used my kitchen scales to weigh them). I drained off the dye liquor, submerged the textile in it and simmered that lot for an hour.  The perfume of simmering plant material is wonderful! After dyeing, I added (for some pieces of cloth) a tad of iron – just a scant teaspoonful- in order to shift the colours to darker hues and to add greys or even blacks.

Three books have been helpful to me so far:

1. Wild Colour: The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes by Jenny Dean

2. Craft of the Dyer: Colour from Plants and Lichens by Karen Leigh Casselman

3. Eco Colour: Botanical Dyes for beautiful Textiles by India Flint

About the Vintage Linens

The linens I dyed have a special provenance: they are vintage refectory linens  from a local monastery that relocated last year. The linens have been embroidered in the corners with red cross stitch as an inventory control marker; and several have been carefully darned by hand. The nuns took care of their linens, even the humblest kitchen cloths, some of which may have been hand woven.

In addition, I am dyeing vintage embroidered tray cloths, doilies, handkerchiefs, damask linen table napkins and the like, all from my stash.

Eco Prints

My aim is  to obtain prints of the fresh plant material that will provide me with inspiration for stitching. Likely several layers of dye and print will precede  stitching, and maybe some will come after stitching.

Dye Plants this month 

I used what was available in plenty in my garden so far this month of June.  Later in the month and later in the summer, other dye plants will be plentiful. Some plants were used for overall dyeing and others for ecoprinting , i.e., obtaining coloured marks from individual leaves, buds, petals, flower heads etc. Here is my list so far (…and more to come later this season).

1. Sumac (Rhus typhina)  leaves for a light green-yellow overall dye colour and for a tannic acid pre-mordant

Note: To make a dye or a tannic acid mordant: simmer fresh sumac leaves in plenty of water to cover for one hour; strain and use as dye or pre-mordant.

2.Anthemis Tinctoria/Golden Marguerite flowers for yellow eco prints.

Note: The yellow daisy-like flowers will bloom around June 24th, the Feast of Saint John the Baptist. Another name for this plant is Saint John’s Daisy.

3.Calendula marigolds for yellow eco prints

4.Tagetes (“marigold”) flowers for orange- yellow eco prints. (The yellow blob inadvertently on the right is my shoe…La Natura Lista makes comfy and colourful shoes…)

5.Purple pansy flowers for blue and purple eco prints

6.Perennial Geranium flowers: magenta for pink eco prints.

Note:  G. macrorhizum has red seed heads shaped long and pointy like a crane’s or heron’s beak, AKA, bill. The seed heads  also print beautifully. The flowers are larger, pale pink and white and are done blooming now. The common name for this plant is Cranesbill.

7.Geranium leaves for green eco prints.  See the leaves as well as flowers in the image above.

The leaves print beautifully in rich bright green on linen with the alum- tannic acid-alum mordant sequence, especially if steamed in an eco bundle.

Note: Pelargoniums are the oft-named “geraniums” we see in the markets each summer for use in summer-only planters.

8.Rose blooms and buds for pink/red/magenta eco prints.

Note: Dried rose petals and buds give a purplish brown colour and an overall mottled pattern on mordanted linen (alum-tannic acid-alum)  if the petals are crushed small, as for tea.  (see textile images below)

9. Rose leaves for green eco prints

10. Apple leaves for warm yellow overall dye on linen with alum and tannic acid; pale yellow with alum. Chartreusey green on cotton if baking soda is added to the last minutes of the dye bath. Grey-greens with iron.

11. Silver maple seeds for khaki-green-brown dyes, overall colour.

12. Purple Sandcherry leaves for purplish eco print colours; colour shifting to blue-blacks with an iron modifier.

13. Hibiscus flower tea (dried): deep pinks,  used here for overall dye.

14. Plum tree bark: warm browny pinks.

15. Vidalia onion skins: a range of yellows, rusts and oranges.

Vintage refectory linen dyed and ecoprinted with garden plants:

These linens were first dyed one colour all over: 

From the left: Sumac gave a first dyeing of green-yellow, later modified with iron liquor to give greys and grey-green;  plum tree bark gave light and darker rose-browns, darker with iron liquor;  hibiscus petals, originally producing pinks,  shifted to greys with iron ; apple leaves gave a warm yellow on cotton and chartreuse on linen withbaking soda in the dye bath at the end; maple seeds gave yellow on linen (weak bath);  sumac gave a range of yellow greens on linens and cottons.

Eco prints and bundles

Then the dyed linens shown above were “eco printed”:  tightly bundled up with other kinds of fresh leaves and blossoms,   fastened securely with elastics and strings and left to develop their coloured prints, either by steaming for an hour or by resting in the sun for many days.

I obtained a lot of  inspiration from India Flint’s blog and book about these processes of ecobundling and ecoprinting. Here are a few images of eco bundles.

Eco bundle 1

Calendula, tagetes, pansy and geranium leaf bundled with alum mordanted vintage damask linen.

Eco bundle 2

This damask linen napkin was mordanted with alum then bundled with pansies (blue-purples) , purple sandcherry leaves (dark blues) , perennial geranium leaves (yellow greens), geranium seed pods (pinks).  The whole was sprayed with 5% vinegar and left to develop by resting in a warm place outdoors, inside a wee ziploc plastic bag.

Developing the eco print

So far, I have found that a reliable way of obtaining a print is to make sure the plants make good contact with the cloth by bundling them up tightly with elastics and string; then by steaming the tied-up bundle at a simmer for an hour at no more than 200 degrees. I used a double boiler with candy thermometer attached until I was sure I could recognize the right kind of “simmer”.  I have also tried leaving the bundle in a plastic baggie in the sun to get the print.  The longer I left the bundles, the deeper the colour – but so far I have only managed three days…Keen curiosity is the enemy of patience in this process!

Dyed and ecoprinted vintage linen refectory cloths

The magic of these overlapping marking/colouring processes is the unpredictable nature of the changes in colour and mark as the layers of dyeing and printing proceed. You can only predict so much…so you learn to embrace the change…For example: In the vintage linen collection, the pale yellow linens (on the far right in the image above) developed as follows:

After immerison in a one colour dye bath, the linens were bundled with various plants and left to develop their colours by resting undisturbed for a few days and/or by being steamed for an hour.

On the left, cloth was first dyed with apple leaves to give light yellow; then eco printed with marigold flowers(yellows); geranium leaves (greens) and flowers (pinks); and purple sandcherry (dark blue-black) .

On the right,  purple sandcherry (blues and dark greys), geranium leaves (greens), and pinks from magenta perennial geranium all darkened with iron liquor on yellow sumac-dyed cloth. The iron modifier shifted the whole range of colours towards greys.

Cloth on the left is dyed with sumac leaves first to give light green, then bundled with tagetes (marigold) petals (for orange yellows), rose leaves and perennial geranium leaves (for medium to light greens) and magenta perennial geranium petals (for bright pinks)

. Cloth on the right is dyed with the sumac for yellow-green and eco printed with tagetes (yellow orange), geranium leaves (light green); purple sandcherry leaves (purple-blue) and rose leaves (medium green);  iron liquor is added to the rinse to shift all hues towards greys, light to dark: this gave moss green-greys instead of yellow greens and dark grey blues instead of purple-blues.